Amaya Online Exec Resigns as NJDGE Warns Probe

Amaya Online Exec Resigns as NJDGE Warns Probe

November 14, 2013 ‐ adminPosted by ‐ Under: Casino News

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Paul Leggert, head of Amaya Gaming’s Ongame Network, has left the Canadian Igaming company in the wake of a warning raised by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (NJDGE). Regulatory investigations into Leggert’s career history could take longer, and would result to unavoidable delays in the approval of Amaya’s NJ license. NJ regulators have to make sure Leggert meets the NJDGE’s suitability standards.

A potential snag in Paul Leggert’s record of accomplishment in the world of Internet gambling is his former role as the Chief Operating Officer of Tokwiro Enterprises ENRG (TEE). The company owned and operated UltimateBet and Absolute Poker, at the time when the Kahnawake Gaming Commission ascertained that high-stakes poker players were being cheated at the two poker sites.

Leggert later alleged that the culprit was former World Series of Poker champion Russ Hamilton, who took advantage of a breach in the site’s gaming software. Paul Leggert claimed that the company had taken actions to correct the flaw in the system, which the company was not aware of when they acquired the two Internet betting sites.

However, in spite of Leggert’s claim of having taken the right steps in resolving the cheating issues, the results of the investigations still left a lot of unanswered questions. Thus, many suspected that Paul Leggert was instrumental in covering up the entire truth behind the 2007-2008 online poker cheating incidents.

In light of the recent turn of events, Paul Leggert agreed to resign so as not to cause further delays in the processing of Amaya’s license application.

Sources:

  • http://www.egrnorthamerica.com/tag/paul-leggett/
  • http://www.bluff.com/news/the-fight-amaya-caesars-deal-raises-questions-about-suitability-process-48645/
  • http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/investigations/poker/documents/tokwiro-statement-112508.pdf
  • http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/investigations/poker/time-scam.html